Catlin Elementary / Lexington

Photography by Nickayla Hodges, a Senior at Kelso High School

Latest News

One-year bond update

At this time last year, Kelso citizens overwhelmingly voted to approve a construction bond and educational levy to improve the learning experience for our students.  We are so thankful for the support and generosity of our community, and continue to work diligently to...

Lake Wilderness tour

Last week, a small team traveled to Tahoma School District for a tour of Lake Wilderness Elementary School. The school has 940 students -- 800 K-5 and 140 pre-K. The team was there in time to see the morning arrival of nearly 200 drop-offs and 13 buses. They met with...

Open houses and FAQs

After realizing we needed to make some changes to our construction plans, we started asking for input from our Kelso community. So far, we've held a public hearing, an open house, and our Superintendent Mary Beth Tack, along with Executive Director of Business &...

Proposed Budget

$35,460,000

Proposed Improvements

  • Repurpose Catlin Elementary School for other district and/or community activities or sell property.
  • Build a new school in Lexington for 600 students to accommodate growing enrollment and class size reduction.

Tell me more

The functional and physical condition ratings of Catlin are the poorest of all our schools. Half the school was burned to the ground in the late 1970’s, and replaced with inadequate modular construction. The school no longer serves as a residential school for the overwhelming majority of students who attend Catlin, and deals with severe parking and traffic flow issues.

In order for the school district to receive the state match for the Lexington site ($11 million), we are required to pull one school off-line for non K-12 use. Possible future uses of Catlin include early learning and preschool programs; partnerships with other community and social service agencies; relocation of school district operations; or, because it’s in a commercial area, it could be sold.

Proposed Plan for New Elementary School in Lexington

The property was purchased as part of the last facility bond in order to meet growing student demand in Lexington.  Approximately $11 million in state matching funds will be used to offset project cost.