Catlin Elementary / Lexington

Photography by Nickayla Hodges, a Senior at Kelso High School

Latest News

Public hearing, open houses scheduled

We're holding a public hearing and two open houses to invite the community to share their thoughts on a proposed change in construction plans for replacing aging elementary schools. (Read more about that here.) The public hearing will be held Monday, December 17th, at...

Considering Plan to Combine Two Elementary Schools

Due to a combination of unanticipated conditions that are causing costs to be higher than originally predicted, we’re considering combining two of the three new elementary schools into one larger school at the Lexington site. Along with the unprecedented rise of labor...

Thanks for your input!

We had a great time showing the initial designs for the new elementary schools at Wallace and Lexington sites. Thanks for coming out and sharing your thoughts with us.

Proposed Budget

$35,460,000

Proposed Improvements

  • Repurpose Catlin Elementary School for other district and/or community activities or sell property.
  • Build a new school in Lexington for 600 students to accommodate growing enrollment and class size reduction.

Tell me more

The functional and physical condition ratings of Catlin are the poorest of all our schools. Half the school was burned to the ground in the late 1970’s, and replaced with inadequate modular construction. The school no longer serves as a residential school for the overwhelming majority of students who attend Catlin, and deals with severe parking and traffic flow issues.

In order for the school district to receive the state match for the Lexington site ($11 million), we are required to pull one school off-line for non K-12 use. Possible future uses of Catlin include early learning and preschool programs; partnerships with other community and social service agencies; relocation of school district operations; or, because it’s in a commercial area, it could be sold.

Proposed Plan for New Elementary School in Lexington

The property was purchased as part of the last facility bond in order to meet growing student demand in Lexington.  Approximately $11 million in state matching funds will be used to offset project cost.